Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th Annual Congress on Infectious Diseases Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Day 2 :

OMICS International Infectious Diseases 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Eugenie Bergogne Berezin photo
Biography:

Eugenie Bergogne-Berezin is a Professor of Clinical Microbiology at University Diderot, Paris. She has studied MD in Medicine and PhD in Sciences in the early 1970s. She is a Chief of Department of Clinical Microbiology and research group, University Bichat Claude-Bernard and developed research on Acinetobacter spp., (nosocomial pathogen, pathogenicity, resistance), pharmacology of antibiotics, tissue distribution (lungs, brain, bronchi), research on intestinal ecology, jejunal flora and bacterial adhesion. She is an Adviser to pharmaceutical companies, expert in pharmacology-toxicology for the Ministry of Health, expert for international journals. She has developed a journal Antibiotics, (Elsevier). She has published 6 medical books, many chapters in international infectious diseases books, 200 articles in scientific journals.

 

Abstract:

2014,17,01, an Editorial entitled “Planetary viral extension” underlined the insufficient attention of Occidental Countries to the 20 EBOLA epidemics within 30 years, with 9936 cases and 4877 deaths. Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone were the most contaminated populations. Starting in Guinea WHO announced 2000 deaths. A French investigation published in 2007 had described a blaze-off epidemics only in 1995 in Kinshasa West with 250 deaths. Since then a brutal development of the disease extremely contagious has gained a rapid geographical extension in all Sub-Saharan Africa, Zaire, Soudan as well as West African countries. A worldwide interest in the disease (the journal TIME in 2014 “now arriving the deadly Ebola virus lands in America” (death was waiting for the traveler). Four major analyzes: (a) Epidemiology: including local surveillance, containment measures, WHO and journals of instant information. (b) Measures Since 2007: CDC-Mobile laboratories, surveillance of suspects or alerts or probable  (febrile or hemorrhagic or deaths cases) (immediately notified). (c) The office of “rumors” (news) (WHO: gloves, javel, mosquitos). Ebola is transmitted directly by contact, imposing the “salut EBOLA” (EBOLA fistful). (d) Funerals major source of contamination with traditional cleaning, embalms in close contact with the body and family members. Containment, surveillance, education, hygiene, medical personnel are current. WHO “Staff at the  outbreak sites see evidence that the nimbers of reported cases and deaths underestimate the magnitude of the outbreak.”

 

OMICS International Infectious Diseases 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Stef Stienstra photo
Biography:

Dr. Stef Stienstra works internationally for several medical and biotech companies as the scientific advisory board member and is also an active reserve-officer of the Royal Dutch Navy in his rank as Commander (OF4). For the Dutch Armed Forces, he is CBRN specialist with the focus on (micro)biological and chemical threats and medical- and environmental functional specialist within the 1st CMI (Civil-Military Interaction) Battalion of the Dutch Armed Forces. For Expertise France he is now managing an EU CBRN CoE public health project in West Africa. He is visiting professor for the University of Rome Tor Vergata in Italy for the CBRN Masters Course and lecturer for the NATO School in Oberammergau in Germany and the Joint NATO CBRN-Defense Center of Excellence in Vyskov in the Czech Republic. In his civilian position, he is at this moment developing with MT-Derm in Berlin (Germany) a novel intradermal vaccination technology as well as a new therapy for cutaneous leishmaniasis for which he has won a Canadian ‘Grand Challenge’ grant. With Hemanua in Dublin (Ireland) he has developed an innovative blood separation unit, which is also suitable to produce convalescent plasma for Ebola Virus Disease therapy. He has finished both his studies in Medicine and in Biochemistry in The Netherlands with a doctorate and has extensive practical experience in cell biology, immuno-hematology, infectious diseases, biodefense, and transfusion medicine. His natural business acumen and negotiation competence help to initiate new successful businesses, often generated by unexpected combinations of technologies.

 

Abstract:

The implementation of the International Health Regulation (IHR) of WHO in 2005 for worldwide public health systems is already in its second extension phase. At the 2012 deadline, only 16% of the countries were fully prepared to detect and respond to pandemics. In 2014 the Ebola Virus Disease outbreak in West Africa was another indicator that WHO’s IHR has to be taken seriously. Especially the biosecurity part of IHR is not fully in place yet for most developing countries, which makes the world vulnerable for bioterrorism. According to the World Bank, the returns from investing in public health are extremely impressive and is not a high-risk venture as with a rapid mortality decline many ‘value life years’ (VLYs) are gained. For low- and middle-income countries typically about a quarter of the growth in full income resulted from VLYs gained and supports not only the local economy but also the world economy. Therefore several international programs help to prepare low- and middle-income countries to mitigate outbreaks of infectious diseases. EU CBRN CoE initiatives and the US CBEP, DTRA, CTR, GEIS, DIMO, USAID, PEPFAR and several other programs are involved in establishing public health systems and give local healthcare workers training in both disease outbreak mitigation and biosecurity. Zoonotic diseases are the most dangerous for outbreaks as the population does not have natural or artificial (from vaccination) immune response to new emerging diseases. Zoonotic diseases are often neglected in the first instance in developing countries. The recent Ebola Virus Disease outbreak in West Africa was such an example. Still, there is hope to find fast and supportive therapies with proper blood bank facilities in place. The therapy with immunoglobulins obtained from plasma donations from survivors is a relatively cheap and effective therapy. International there was some criticism of this method, as for this therapy it is extremely important that the convalescent plasma has to be safe for other blood transmissible diseases.  But as it is feasible with other convalescent plasma therapies, the necessary safety tests can be done in the laboratories, which are installed for the outbreak diagnosis. Convalescent plasma can be obtained from a donor, who has survived the disease, with a novel hollow fiber blood separation technology. This results in an immunoglobulin concentration, which does not need for its production any sophisticated infrastructure. This patented and recently developed disposable device is developed in cooperation with the Irish Blood Transfusion Service.

Dr. Stef Stienstra works internationally for several medical and biotech companies as the scientific advisory board member and is also an active reserve-officer of the Royal Dutch Navy in his rank as Commander (OF4). For the Dutch Armed Forces, he is CBRN specialist with the focus on (micro)biological and chemical threats and medical- and environmental functional specialist within the 1st CMI (Civil-Military Interaction) Battalion of the Dutch Armed Forces. For Expertise France he is now managing an EU CBRN CoE public health project in West Africa. He is visiting professor for the University of Rome Tor Vergata in Italy for the CBRN Masters Course and lecturer for the NATO School in Oberammergau in Germany and the Joint NATO CBRN-Defense Center of Excellence in Vyskov in the Czech Republic. In his civilian position, he is at this moment developing with MT-Derm in Berlin (Germany) a novel intradermal vaccination technology as well as a new therapy for cutaneous leishmaniasis for which he has won a Canadian ‘Grand Challenge’ grant. With Hemanua in Dublin (Ireland) he has developed an innovative blood separation unit, which is also suitable to produce convalescent plasma for Ebola Virus Disease therapy. He has finished both his studies in Medicine and in Biochemistry in The Netherlands with a doctorate and has extensive practical experience in cell biology, immuno-hematology, infectious diseases, biodefense, and transfusion medicine. His natural business acumen and negotiation competence help to initiate new successful businesses, often generated by unexpected combinations of technologies.

 

Keynote Forum

Ivana Haluskova Balter

French society of immunology, France

Keynote: Tackling neglected diseases in current context
OMICS International Infectious Diseases 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ivana Haluskova Balter photo
Biography:

Haluskova Balter Ivana , MD,MBA, France, French/Slovak active medical professional specialised in infectious diseases, internal medicine covering various therapeutic axes, certified in Immunology and Pediatric, MBA in vaccinology. Lived multi-country medical “field “experience  in Southeast Asia, West/Central/East Europe and Middle East. Speaking French, English, Russian, Italian, Czech, and Slovak with notion of Mandarin. Over 15   years of experience in pharmaceutical research and development for European and USA companies as Medical lead /Director of R&D in various therapeutic areas and as Scientific and Medical independent consultant for various academic and private stakeholders globally. Active member of French immunology society (SFI) administrative board and several international academic societies with focus on R&D  innovation and partnership highlighting role immunology/immune-metabolism and genetics for innovative treatment, prevention and diagnostic. Member of advisory Health concern (India) and think tank group in order to attract attention to role of accessible medical care, education and awareness along with accurate diagnostic and innovative partnership in this area. Years of expertise to work globally but recently more focused on BRICS as  Medical advisor for scientific partnership, bringing new innovative concepts alive and getting them endorsed.

 

Abstract:

The fight against the Neglected Tropical Diseases receiving increased  worldwide attention after the recent attribution of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine to William Campbell and Satoshi Ōmura for their development of a novel therapy against infections caused by roundworm parasites. Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) known to be a diverse and growing group of communicable diseases that prevail in tropical and subtropical conditions in 149 countries affect more than one billion people and cost developing economies billions of dollars every year. Populations living in poverty, without adequate sanitation and in close contact with infectious vectors and domestic animals and livestock are those worst affected. Despite encouraging progress, millions of people still need free high-quality treatments and millions more still need care and treatment for human dog-mediated rabies, echinococcosis, leishmaniasis and other neglected tropical diseases seemingly difficult to treat. Neglected tropical diseases program in global manner encompass biology of parasites and their vectors. Its research program addresses global public health concerns in terms of disease prevention, control and antiparasitic treatment. Along with understanding of the dynamic interactions between these microorganisms and their hosts, identifying the fundamental bases of parasitism and transmission by vectors, host invasion mechanisms, and determine parasite factors underlying virulence and pathology of these organisms. From scientific point of view, tackling infectious and tropical disease encompass various aspects including like transmission mechanisms, virulence factors, pathogens reservoirs, host immune response working transversally through epidemiology , microbiology, genetics and genomics, cell biology, biochemistry and bioinformatics and imaging. Apart vector born diseases like Dengue and Zika recent research in France look particularly on three key eukaryotic pathogens responsible for severe parasitic diseases that have a significant health and economic impact and affect most of the world’s population: Plasmodium the causative agent of malaria, Leishmania – the agent of leishmaniasis, and Trypanosoma brucei – responsible for sleeping sickness. The Anopheles mosquito, which is the vector of Plasmodium and a number of arboviruses, is being studied along with the tsetse fly, the vector of African trypanosomiasis. Fundamental research on  in vitro and in vivo models – including field work in Africa, Asia, South America – with applied research on resistance to antimalarial drugs and on the discovery of new antiparasitic drugs include exploration of traditional medicine and methods like reverse pharmacology.Accurate diagnostic and surveillance with better understanding of genetic and immunologic background of host specific response and pathogen evolution drives adapted vaccine research but also preventive interventions. As one of examples to illustrate it, global mapping of resistance to artemisinin (the KARMA study driven by Institut Pasteur in Paris and the Institut Pasteur in Cambodia and members of Institut Pasteur International Network) monitoring risk of spread of artemisine resistance from Asia to Africa using discovery of kelch(K13)–propeller domains as the primary determinant of artemisinin resistance. Immunology is relatively new science about composition, functions, reaction of immune system. Host immune system co-evolute with pathogens and commensal microbiota given individual genetic predispositions and variability and remains along with neuroendocrine system one of the key to maintain homeostasis of organism. Knowledge in immunology is growing and providing clinically valuable solutions across various for diagnostic, preventive (innovative vaccination ) and treatment strategies including neglected and tropical diseases. Based on works natural defences to infection are mediated by intrinsic/innate and adaptive immune responses. Understanding the role of early metabolic mediators of inflammatory responses to infection and principles of immuno-metabolism expect to help in the development of urgently needed host directed therapeutic, preventive (vaccines) and diagnostic  innovations knowing limitations of existing tools.